Posts tagged ‘Contagious Equine Metritis’

Contagious Equine Metritis Situation Report for Ohio

Leah C. Dorman, DVM and Assistant State Veterinarian, Ohio Department of Agriculture, has release a CEM situation report for April 7, 2009:

Here in Ohio, we have had a total of 38 mares that have been exposed to CEM. Of these 38 mares: 32 have been released from quarantine (27 completed testing and five moved out of state to complete testing); one has started the testing process; and five have not yet started testing. Ohio also has had 14 stallions that were exposed to CEM. Ten of these stallions have started the testing/treatment process. One stallion has moved out of state to complete testing and treatment. One stallion has completed the testing process and is negative.

Due to the fact that CEM is a foreign animal disease, state or federal animal health officials are required to train and witness testing and treatment protocols performed by veterinary practitioners. We have good cooperation from both the equine community and practicing veterinarians. Thanks for your interest and support.

For Ohio specific CEM-related questions, please contact either Dr. Leah Dorman at the Ohio Department of Agriculture (614-728-6220) or Dr. Daniel Harpster at USDA-APHIS-Veterinary Services (614-309-2832).

There is a new CEM fact sheet written in March 2009. The link is as follows:

http://www.aphis.usda.gov/publications/animal_health/content/printable_version/fs_CEMrev09.pdf

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April 8, 2009 at 1:58 pm

Contagious Equine Metritis Ohio Update

A total of 13 stallions have been confirmed by USDA’s National Veterinary Services Laboratories (NVSL) as positive for Taylorella equigenitalis, the causative organism of contagious equine metritis (CEM). In addition to the positive stallions, the NVSL has confirmed that three mares have CEM. None of the positive horses have yet been identified as the source of the outbreak; the epidemiologic investigation continues to pursue all available information relative to determining the origin of this outbreak, but no conclusions can yet be drawn. According to Leah C. Dorman, Assistant State Veterinarian Ohio Department of Agriculture:

Here in Ohio, we have had a total of 38 mares that have been exposed to CEM. Of these 38 mares: 23 have been released from quarantine (19 completed testing and four moved out of state to complete testing); nine have started the testing process; and six have not yet started testing. Ohio also has had 14 stallions that were exposed to CEM. Ten of these stallions have started the testing/treatment process. One stallion has completed the testing process and is negative. Due to the fact that CEM is a foreign animal disease, state or federal animal health officials are required to train and witness testing and treatment protocols performed by veterinary practitioners. We have good cooperation from both the equine community and practicing veterinarians. Thanks for your interest and support.

For Ohio specific CEM-related questions, please contact either Dr. Leah Dorman at the Ohio Department of Agriculture (614-728-6220) or Dr. Daniel Harpster at USDA-APHIS-Veterinary Services (614-309-2832).

March 17, 2009 at 7:30 am 2 comments

Contagious Equine Metritis–Ohio Situation Report

There are 17 States known to have exposed or positive stallions: Alabama, Delaware, Florida, Georgia, Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky, Louisiana, Michigan, Mississippi, Nebraska, North Carolina, Ohio, Texas, Washington, Wisconsin, and Wyoming. The exposure for most of the stallions has been co-location at a breeding facility with at least one positive stallion.  According to Dr. Leah Dorman, Assistant State Veterinarian Ohio Department of Agriculture:

Here in Ohio, we have had a total of 37 mares that have been exposed to CEM. Of these 37 mares: 18 have been released from quarantine (15 completed testing and three moved out of state to complete testing); eight have started the testing process; and 11 have not yet started testing. Ohio also has had 14 stallions that were exposed to CEM. Eight of these stallions have started the testing/treatment process. One stallion has completed the testing process and is negative.

The CEM fact sheet web link is:

http://www.aphis.usda.gov/publications/animal_health/content/printable_version/fs_ahcem.pdf

Due to the fact that CEM is a foreign animal disease, state or federal animal health officials are required to train and witness testing and treatment protocols performed by veterinary practitioners. We have good cooperation from both the equine community and practicing veterinarians. Thanks for your interest and support.

For Ohio specific CEM-related questions, please contact either Dr. Leah Dorman at the Ohio Department of Agriculture (614-728-6220) or Dr. Daniel Harpster at USDA-APHIS-Veterinary Services (614-309-2832).

March 5, 2009 at 5:03 pm

Contagious Equine Metritis Update for Ohio

A total of 11 stallions have been confirmed by USDA’s National Veterinary Services Laboratories (NVSL) as positive for Taylorella equigenitalis, the causative organism of contagious equine metritis (CEM). In addition to the positive stallions, the NVSL has confirmed that two mares have CEM. Three of the positive stallions are located in Indiana, four are in Kentucky, one is in Texas, and three are in Wisconsin. One positive mare is located in Wisconsin and one is in Illinois. None of the positive horses have yet been identified as the source of the outbreak; the epidemiologic investigation continues to pursue all available information relative to determining the origin of this outbreak, but no conclusions can yet be drawn.

Dr. Leah Dorman, Assistant State Veterinarian-Ohio Department of Agriculture, recently released this statement on February 17:

Here in Ohio, we have 37 mares that have been exposed to CEM. Of these 37 mares, 4 have completed their testing, are negative, and have been released from quarantine. An additional 20 of the 37 mares have started the testing and treatment protocol. Ohio also has 14 stallions that are quarantined. Two of these stallions have started the testing/treatment process.

Due to the fact that CEM is a foreign animal disease, state or federal animal health officials are required to train and witness testing and treatment protocols performed by veterinary practitioners. We have good cooperation from both the equine community and practicing veterinarians. Thanks for your interest and support.

For Ohio specific CEM-related questions, please contact either Dr. Leah Dorman at the Ohio Department of Agriculture (614-728-6220) or Dr. Daniel Harpster at USDA-APHIS-Veterinary Services (614-309-2832).

February 19, 2009 at 8:00 am

Contagious Equine Metritis: Ohio Update

Contagious Equine Metritis (CEM) has been confirmed in Indiana, Kentucky and Texas by USDA’s National Veterinary Services Laboratories. Contagious Equine Metritis is an extremely contagious venereal disease of horses. Although not necessarily fatal to horses, the disease has a very high incidence of causing horses to be sick and possibly lead to infertility. The USDA has an excellent description of the disease here:

http://www.aphis.usda.gov/newsroom/hot_issues/cem/index.shtml

Leah C. Dorman, DVM, Assistant State Veterinarian, gives the Ohio situation report:

Here in Ohio, we have approximately 30 mares and three stallions that are quarantined and are in the testing/treatment process. We have good cooperation from both the equine community and practicing veterinarians.

We have had some inquiries from horse owners/veterinarians that would like to have non-exposed stallions or mares cultured for CEM. We are not encouraging CEM culturing of the “worried well” at this time. There are a limited number of CEM certified labs in the country, including Ohio ADDL and NVSL. The CEM incident exposed horses take precedence over any other horses. If you are an equine practitioner who imports/exports out of the country, we will work those cases in as needed.

Due to the fact that CEM is a foreign animal disease, state or federal animal health officials are required to train and witness testing and treatment protocols performed by veterinary practitioners.

For Ohio specific CEM-related questions, please contact either Dr. Leah Dorman at the Ohio Department of Agriculture (614-728-6220) or Dr. Daniel Harpster at USDA-APHIS-Veterinary Services (614-309-2832). Thanks for your interest and support.

All CEM-positive horses, and all exposed horses that have been located, are currently under quarantine or hold order. Testing and treatment protocols are being put into action for all located horses throughout the U.S.

January 24, 2009 at 12:58 am 4 comments


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This blog is no longer being maintained. Information on this blog may still be relevant, but for the latest agronomic information and farm management information please visit http://corn.osu.edu and http://ohioagmanager.osu.edu, respectively.

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