Posts tagged ‘oats’

Cover Crop and Drainage Water Management Field Day

Van Wert SWCD and OSU Extension Van Wert are cosponsoring a cover crop and water management field day. The field day will be held at two separate locations during two sessions on April 7.

The first session will run 9:00 a.m. – 11:00 a.m. at Ron Kill’s field approximately 0.25 mile south of the intersection of US 224 and Convoy Heller Road on the west side of Convoy Heller Road, just south of the power substation (park on the west side of the road). This session will be outdoors so plan to dress accordingly for the weather. Jim Hoorman, OSU Extension Mercer County will be discussing cereal rye, oats, cowpeas and oilseed radish. Ken Kottenbrock, Van Wert SWCD is scheduled to discuss cover crop incentive programs through EQIP. Pond Seed Company will be present to show seed size of various cover crops and discuss seed pricing. Ron Kill will be available to discuss his experiences with cover crops. A soil pit will be available to examine the impact of cover crops on soil quality and structure.

The second session will run 1:00 p.m. – 3:00 p.m. at 2498 John Brown Road (pull into the barnyard on west side of road). This session will be partially outdoors, so dress accordingly for the weather. Norman Fausey, NRCS Supervisory Soil Scientist will be discussing the value and benefits of installing a water control structure and how that impacts field water management. Ken Kottenbrock, Van Wert SWCD will discuss incentives available for drainage control structures, and Ron Schumm will be available to discuss his experiences with his water control structure.

This is a BYOC (bring your own coffee) event and lunch will be on your own. Preregistration is not required. Questions on this field day can be directed to Andy Kleinschmidt, OSU Extension at 419-203-5967 or Ken Kottenbrock, Van Wert SWCD at 419-238-9591.

Full podcast

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March 31, 2010 at 8:15 am 1 comment

Tips On Establishing Cover Crops

Cover crops offer many benefits for agriculture that include erosion control; reduced compaction and nutrient leaching; increased water infiltration; improved soil biodiversity; weed control and disease suppression; increased carbon sequestration and maximum nutrient recycling; improved air, soil, and water quality; and wildlife enhancement. Every cover crop species has its own niche and attributes for agricultural production.

So, a common question is ‘what should I use for a cover crop?’ The answer is not straightforward, and can depend on an individuals’ preference. Below are just a few options I have compiled following a wheat crop. For a more robust discussion of options I encourage you to read the OSU Factsheet Sustainable Crop Rotations with Cover Crops.

Following wheat, planned crop soybeans:

Option 1: Cereal rye

  • Drill cereal rye at a rate of 1 bushel/acre
  • Note that cereal rye will not winterkill
  • The cereal rye will get very tall (maybe 2-3’)
  • Drill/plant soybeans into the standing cereal rye. Do not kill the rye prior to planting
  • Chemically kill the rye after the soybeans have emerged.
  • Suppliers: http://www.pondseedco.com/, Burtch Seed, Tama  or Mid Wood Cooperative, Bowling Green
  • Be sure to ask for cereal rye (referred to as winter rye) and not annual rye
  • Plant by 1st week  of August

Option 2: Oats

  • Drill oats at 1.5 bu/acre
  • Oats should winterkill
  • Oats can ‘mat’ down so delay planting until 1st week of September
  • Suppliers: several, any common oats will work

Following wheat, planned crop corn:

Option 1: Cowpeas

  • Drill Cowpeas at 40-50 lb/acre
  • Requires early start, wheat harvest and landleveling need to be done quickly
  • Plant in July- preferably mid-July
  • Cowpeas will winterkill
  • Add additional nitrogen to corn starter (watch salt content)
  • Conduct Pre-Sidedress Nitrate Test (PSNT) on corn to determine how much nitrogen to sidedress
  • Suppliers: http://www.pondseedco.com/, Burtch Seed, Tama  or Mid Wood Cooperative, Bowling Green; Pricing on Austrian Winter peas at the time of this writing are $0.90-$1.15/lb.

Option 2: Oilseed Radish

  • Ideal is to plant on 30” spacing
  • If planting is not an option, broadcast
  • Plant 1-2 lb/acre or broadcast at a low rate of 3-5 lb/acre in August (standard rec is 8-10 lb/acre)
  • Radish will winterkill
  • Plant corn seed 1-2” off the oilseed radish row (if the radish had been planted)
  • Add additional nitrogen to corn starter (watch salt content)
  • Conduct Pre-Sidedress Nitrate Test (PSNT) to determine how much nitrogen to sidedress
  • Suppliers: http://www.pondseedco.com/, Burtch Seed, Tama  or Mid Wood Cooperative, Bowling Green; at time of this article Minowasa Oilseed radishes were $2.14-$2.30/lb.

Full podcast here:

February 24, 2010 at 8:15 am


Notice

This blog is no longer being maintained. Information on this blog may still be relevant, but for the latest agronomic information and farm management information please visit http://corn.osu.edu and http://ohioagmanager.osu.edu, respectively.

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