Posts tagged ‘wind turbines’

BP Soliciting Wind Energy Leases NW Ohio

BP Wind Energy is a principal owner and operator of wind power facilities with interest in eight operating wind farms.  BP Wind Energy has a gross generating capacity of more than 1,200 megawatts, enough to provide leecticity for a city the size of Washington DC. BP Wind Energy has a presence in California, Colorado, Indiana, Kansas, South Dakota, Idaho and Texas.  BP is looking to expand their presence to Ohio.

BP logo

This meeting was sponsored by Ohio Farm Bureau provide information on community responsibilities and potential benefits of wind energy. Ohio Farm Bureau has presented 90 wind/alternative energy meetings throughout Ohio in the past 12 months.

Wind energy was never designed to be a stand-alone energy production technology.  It is part of a diversified energy plan that is being developed on a regional, statewide and multi-state energy strategy. Wind energy is expected to produce five percent of the nation’s electricity by 2020; twenty percent by 2030.

The Ohio Power Siting Board has made available an interactive map of wind resources for Ohio. The interactive map is available at http://maps.opsb.ohio.gov/windmap/default.aspx

According to Ohio Farm Bureau and BP, there are some direct economic benefits:

  • Land lease payments $7,000/MW/year (MW = megawatt) – Ohio Farm Bureau Data
  • Short term jobs = 15 per MW –  Ohio Farm Bureau Data
  • Long term jobs = 0.6 per MW – Ohio Farm Bureau Data
  • 1 MW = energy production for 300 standard homes – BP Data

This is the same BP as the oil company. In 2006, BP decided to venture into the renewable energy business. Their projects are a mix of wholly-owned and partnership ventures.  In Ohio, BP is targeting 200 MW for Phase I.

According to the BP representative the Fowler, Indiana BP project is 600 MW and supports roughly 50 full-time employees.

BP is examining the southern part of Van Wert County, in NW Ohio and will be securing approximately 15,000 acres.

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July 13, 2010 at 9:40 pm 5 comments

Wind Turbine Public Hearing for Iberdrola Renewables in Ohio — Pros and Cons

On July 8, 2010, approximately 120 attended a public hearing for Heartland Wind Energy project in rural Van Wert County.  This was a legal hearing, and anyone wishing to give testimony had to raise their right hand and swear that the testimony given will be the truth. Prior to giving testimony, individuals also had to state whether there residence is or is not in the project area.
Iberdrola Renewables
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According to Iberdrola Renewables, the company financing this wind project, the project in Van Wert and Paulding County has a scope of 159 wind turbines, which will provide about 80,000 houses with electricity.

Iberdrola Renewables public hearing

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According to the official records on file with the Ohio Siting Board:

Heartland Wind, LLC is proposing to construct, own and operate up to 350 MW of wind-powered electric generation in Van Wert and Paulding counties.  Heartland Wind, LLC is managed by Iberdrola renewable, Inc.  The facility would require up to 175 wind turbine generators that would be located within a 40,500-acre project area.  Approximately 140 participating landowners would provide about 17,000 acres of leased land.  The application was filed on December 21, 2009.

All the official documents are available at http://dis.puc.state.oh.us/CaseRecord.aspx?CaseNo=09-1066

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Why wind energy? Well, one reason is that Ohio has a mandate (ORC 4928.64):

  • 25% of electricity shall be provided from Alternative Energy Resources by 2025
  • Half of the 25% may be advanced energy resources (improved process or equipment, or clean coal technology)
  • At least half of the 25% renewable energy resources including 0.5% solar
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Random fact: In Ohio, the wind turbine must be a minimum 750 feet from horizontal extended blade tip to nearest residence.
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Testimony was polarized, and fell into two categories. The numbers I present below aren’t official; they may or may not be accurate (they should be fairly close, though). The bullet points below are recorded as I recall from the given testimony.
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Pro testimony (n = 10):

8- residence NOT in wind project zone

2- residence IN wind project zone

  • economic development
  • job creation
  • progress and new industry
  • will benefit county coffers, townships, state
  • environmental impacts negligible
  • stop sending energy dollars overseas (reduce reliance on foreign energy)
  • supports green, clean, renewable energy
  • benefits far outweigh any negative impacts
  • $1.5 million per year to farmers in annual payments
  • can help preserve agricultural ground for agricultural use
  • 215 new construction jobs
  • 20 permanent high paying maintenance jobs created
  • local career center has a wind energy education program
  • our power needs are increasing, wind turbines help meet that power need

Con testimony (n = 8):

3- residence NOT in wind project zone

5- residence IN wind project zone

  • degradation of quality of life
  • obstructed views
  • disruption of bird life, bird migratory patterns
  • several references to scientific studies on the negative health effects (sorry, I don’t have the references — my fingers are too slow)
  • the project was referred to as ‘industrial’, ‘commercial’
  • sleep disturbance
  • shadow flicker, strobing
  • property value declination
  • wind project is highly subsidized
  • local contractors won’t be used
  • poor television reception
  • health effects on children
  • infrasound (below limit of hearing) has a human health effect
  • noise sounds like jet engines
  • ice throw
  • blade shear
  • we’re not reducing foreign energy
  • very inefficient source of energy

July 8, 2010 at 7:18 pm

National Wind Developing Wind Farms in Northwest Ohio

I had an opportunity to attend an invitation-only meeting on September 1, 2009 for Northwest Ohio Wind Energy. National Wind is the manager and developer of Northwest Ohio Wind Energy. The purpose of the meeting was to educate landowners in the footprint of Northwest Ohio Wind Energy (NWOWE) about: 1) NWOWE, 2) National Wind as a manager, and 3) to discuss the concept of community wind.  Community wind is is generated by turbines that are at least partially owned by local landowners and other members or entities (such as schools). NWOWE is currently in the process of securing land and hopes to secure 30,000 acres, with a projected construction date of 2011.

This model of wind power development is different from the model proposed by Iberdrola and Horizon Wind Energy, which are also both securing land contracts in Van Wert and Paulding Counties. Unlike Iberdrola or Horizon, the NWOWE plan allows for community ownership of the project and potentially higher payments to the landowners.  The proposed wind farm from NWOWE  will have an output of 300 MW. There are some similarities with all three companies. All have robust provisions for fixing drain tiles, which is a major concern for this part of Ohio where topography is very flat and subsurface drainage is critical. Disruptions are unavoidable during the burying of transmission lines. The lines are set four feet underground and sometimes drain tiles are cut as the lines are being buried. Again, all three companies, Horizon, Iberdrola, and NWOWE offer various ways to repair those cut drain tile.

NWOWE is using National Wind as the project manager. National Wind has developed a 50 MW Jeffers Wind Energy Center in western Minnesota that has been in operation since 2008. National Wind also has one project totaling 169.5 MW in eastern North Dakota operating as M-Power Luverne Wind Farm.

The success of this and other wind projects in Ohio hinges on the Ohio law enacted last year establishing an alternative energy portfolio standard.  This is a government mandate that by the year 2025 Ohio utilities must purchase at least 25% of their electricity from alternative sources. Of that 25%, half must come from renewable electricity sources, such as wind. Fufrthermore, over half the renewable energy (6.5% of all Ohio electricity purchased) must be generated in-state. So long as this law is not repealled, there is strong incentive and upside for wind development projects in Ohio.

September 3, 2009 at 8:15 am 3 comments

Small Wind Turbine Webinar

I’ve been discussing large scale wind turbine projects on this blog recently.  I ran across this meeting notice for small-scale wind turbines.  The High Plains Energy Team is hosting a free webinar on small-scale wind turbines.  Below are the details.

Program Summary:

This webcast gives an overview of small wind turbines. Topics to be covered include: applications, estimating wind turbine production, policies & economics, the process for installing small wind turbines, small wind system components, and technology questions. This presentation gives participants the tools needed to determine if a wind system is appropriate to a particular application and to avoid common pitfalls encountered in analyzing and executing small wind turbine projects.

Presenter:

Antonio C. Jimenez – National Renewable Energy Laboratory(NREL)/National Wind Technology Center. Mr. Jimenez is a member of the NREL Wind Powering America team.

Suggested web resources:

American Wind Energy Association (AWEA) Web Site:  www.awea.org

Wind Powering America Web Site:   www.windpoweringamerica.gov

Windustry Web Site:   www.windustry.org

How Do I Connect:

February 13 from 11:00 AM – 12:30 PM CST (12:00 noon – 1:30 PM EST). You will need to have a computer with Internet access. At the meeting time, simply click on the following link or copy and paste it into your browser to enter the meeting.

http://connect.extension.iastate.edu/nebraska/

When you go to that URL you will find yourself at a login page. Simply click on “Click to Enter” under the “Enter as a Guest” heading. You will then be prompted for your name. Enter your name and click “Enter” to enter the meeting space. The instructions that detail how to join the integrated phone audio conference will be on the screen when you join the meeting.

The audio portion of the presentation will require you to have speakers for your computer. You can check your ability to hear the audio by connecting to this archived web seminar – http://connect.extension.iastate.edu/p48538028/ . Audio volume can be adjusted by going to “Start”, then “Control Panel”, then “Sounds and Audio”.

Anytime before the meeting you can visit the following URL to confirm your ability to connect to a virtual meeting room:  http://breeze.extension.iastate.edu/common/help/en/support/meeting_test.htm (may need to hit browser refresh button to activate)

January 29, 2009 at 8:00 am 2 comments

Wind Energy in Van Wert County Part Deux: Challenges

On Monday, January 26, I attended another large-scale wind energy meeting in Van Wert.  The meeting featured Ohio Farm Bureau’s Dale Arnold as well as Iberdrola Renewables Wind Land Consultant Dave Dickson.  This post is more or less a followup to one of the first posts I did on wind energy (click here for that post).

There are essentially two major companies shopping wind leases in Van Wert, Iberdrola Renewables and Horizon Wind Energy.  Since Horizon Wind Energy was not at this meeting (due to an unavoidable conflict) I’ll focus on Iberdrola Renewables.  The company is based in Spain and has developed 29 windfarms in the U.S.

Iberdrola Renewables has one project in the area, “Blue Creek Wind Power Project”, with a stated goal to secure 40,000+ acres for wind energy turbines.  Mr. Dickson provided a general overview of the project, which is very similar to the Horizon Wind Energy project.  Both companies are looking to sign contracts with landowners in Tully and Union townships (northwest and northcentral Van Wert County), as well as parts of Paulding County and Allen County, Indiana.

If all conditions are met, Iberdrola Renewables has a timeline indicating that construction may start by 2010 with all turbines operational by 2011. Payments are similar to Horizon Wind Energy, providing $5,000+ per year to a landowner (assume one 1.8-2MW turbine for 80 acres).  Lease period is 30 years with an option for an additional 20 years.

I see a few challenges, and I’m not quite clear how these challenges will be met.  The issue of checkerboarding could present a significant obstacle to overcome. Checkerboarding is a term used in land development to describe what happens when two (or more) companies work independently and in competition to sign land contracts.  For example, two side-by-side land parcels could each have a contract signed by a different wind energy company.  From what I understand, if one wind energy company develops a large scale wind farm the competing company(ies) may leave the area and look eslewhere without building a single turbine.  The problem is that leases are typically not exchanged or purchased between the wind energy companies.  Therefore, if you sign a lease with the ‘wrong’ company you may not get any turbines.  Checkerboarding has already occurred in Van Wert County.  As I looked at the map provided by Iberdrola Renewables, I could identify areas of relatively close proximity where both Iberdrola Renewables and Horizon Wind Energy have lease contracts.

The current process seems to be lacking in community planning.  In a community planned system, parcels could be identified and leased by a single entity.  This single entity could represent one, two or more wind energy companies.  The goal being to unify the land development process so that maximum financial benefit is achieved for all parties: landowners, neighbors, school systems, community and the wind turbine companies.  A locally owned project may also alleviate the issue of checkerboarding.

ADDITION (February 2, 2009):

Dan Litchfield, Business Developer for Iberdrola Renewables provided some very helpful clarifications-

  • Heartland Wind, LLC is 100% owned by Iberdrola Renewables, Inc.
  • The LLC company form is used by us primarily to help organize our nationwide leasing efforts. We have separate legal entities for our west coast development and east coast development.
  • Another major wind developer, NextEra Energy (fka FPL Energy) also has a leasing subsidiary called Heartland Wind, LLC, but it is registered in a different state and is a totally separate company
  • If any landowners are uneasy about leasing to Heartland Wind, LLC, we are happy to add on their contract that Heartland Wind is a wholly-owned subsidiary of Iberdrola Renewables, Inc. Also, later this year we may prepare leases directly with Iberdrola Renewables, Inc.

January 27, 2009 at 8:00 am 4 comments

Legal Education Resources Related to the Emerging Wind Energy Industry

Van Wert County is receiving considerable attention form a few wind development companies. Specifically, Tully and Union townships are garnering most of the spotlight. Many individuals have asked me about legal resources that may be availble to them. Below is a compilation of Agricultural Legal Education resources on Wind Energy Development has been compiled by the new Community of Practice for Agricultural Law and its members.  Below are a few of the resources that I found most useful.  If you are going to read just one resource, I suggest the Iowa State University link.

Center for Agricultural Law and Taxation, Iowa State University (October 2008)

http://www.calt.iastate.edu/briefs/CALTLegalBrief-WindEnergyProduction-LegalIssues.pdf

Negotiating Wind Energy Property Agreements by Jessica A. Shoemaker (June 2007)

http://www.flaginc.org/topics/pubs/arts/WindPropertyAgrmnts2007.pdf

Albany Law Center – “Law of the Land” (blog on legal aspects of wind farm development)

http://lawoftheland.wordpress.com/category/wind-development/

January 19, 2009 at 6:47 pm 2 comments

Windfarm Observations

Not from me, but from Charles Profit. Charles Profit called me earlier in the week and told me that he was headed off to Illinois. He asked if I was interested in having him take a look at Horizon Energy’s wind turbine project in McLean County, Illinois. Of course I jumped at the chance to have Charles get me some pictures and give me his opinion.

After Charles’ visit to Illinois he called me and gave me his comments. He indicated that he was impressed with the size and scale of the project. He said the biggest issue that Horizon (or any other windfarm company would have in Van Wert) would face is siting. Van Wert County is considered a rural community. But unlike the area where the turbines were located in Illinois, we have houses spread out all over the countryside. You can’t drive a mile without seeing one or two (or more) houses. That will make for a challenge to site wind turbines.

The below pictures are from the Horizon Energy Twin Groves Wind Farm in Illinois. Thanks, Charles, for the great pictures and your commentary.

August 22, 2008 at 7:00 am

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